678 ET ~ Week Seven: How can 3D printing change the way we think about education?

678 ET ~ Week Seven: How can 3D printing change the way we think about education?

When I first read this title, all I could think of is all the wasted paper my kids have from printing Minecraft pages and Peanutize characters. I have to admit, I had not seen how the printers work until I looked on the 3dprinting.com site. I was impressed by the technology.

“3D printing or additive manufacturing is a process of making three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. The creation of a 3D printed object is achieved using additive processes. In an additive process an object is created by laying down successive layers of material until the object is created (3dprinting.com).”

3d-printing-perception-1

As mentioned above 3d printing creates objects from modeling sites. The most used ingredient is plastic. However, we did see how the printers can make food, shoes, houses, and used even in the medical field for cloning.

There are so many ways that this technology could be used for education. The tinkering side to the growth mindset is very involved in this invention. I think the first lesson plans for this machinery might be standardized and even elementary at first. However, I think that the students will be able to create many new inventions after getting the foundation to what the device can do. I could see elementary schools using creations to support learning the alphabet and math problems. I can see adding models to reports later in the middle grades. In high school, I could see building robots and model cars. The opportunities to create inventions will be endless.

In addition, when you break or lose a small plastic piece to just about anything, you can just engineer the needed part! I can see how this is a great invention for not only education and health but also the automotive industry. I do wonder if recreating a part say for Nissan, will be a violation of a copyright.

 

Sources:

Anonymous. (N.D.). Retrieved June 28, 2016, from http://3dprinting.com/what-is-3d-printing/

Anonymous. (N.D.). 3D PRINTING FOR EDUCATION. Retrieved June 28, 2016, from http://www.lpfrg.com/en/professionals/education/

Eadicicco, Lisa. (2015, Feb 18). 23 useful things you can make with a 3-D printer. Retrieved June 28, 2016, from http://www.businessinsider.com/useful-3d-printer-projects-2015-2?op=1

 

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8 thoughts on “678 ET ~ Week Seven: How can 3D printing change the way we think about education?

  1. Hi Josie, I didn’t have a clue how 3D printing worked–it was mind boggling to me–until my husband got one for his CTE classes. It’s amazing–you can watch something be built layer by layer. I even read in one article that someone has 3D printed a hamburger! The possibilities certainly seem endless. This along with the example you mentioned of the medical field remind me of the article I read that said we have to be careful because laws and ethics haven’t really caught up with the explosion in 3D printing.

    I like your very applicable example of printing missing parts–what a super idea! Another thought I had for elementary schools besides alphabet and math problem applications was during reading, or science, or ss to be able to print an artifacts, like a fossil, for the students to handle and examine. How powerful would it be to be able to make more learning hands on and give our students the ability to handle objects they wouldn’t otherwise get a chance to?!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Your blog makes me wonder about how much material would be wasted and thrown out in the process of using the 3D printer. I know that designing prototypes isn’t necessarily considered a waste, since the designer would be learning from each design, but still, plenty of material would be used in that process. I wonder how school districts feel about spending money on the materials for the 3D printers, when so much would not be used for the ideal final product.

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  3. I love all the potential uses that you listed for 3D printers. I am looking to purchase a 3D printer, but the only models I see use plastic. That doesn’t seem that useful except to make models. I do like the idea of engineering replacement parts it they are plastic. Good post.

    Like

  4. Josie,
    Week 7

    What a great way to use 3D printers for elementary students! Using different colors to teach the way word parts blend, to create word families and to label play areas in a Kindergarten room. Math comparisons and concepts come alive with manipulative items. We would no longer be limited to what the manufacturers create for us. We could make measuring devices, meaningful to the student items for categorizing, then using these for gifting. For example, categorizing animals or sea life from the area that students made, use them to study math with, then pass them to the next class or trade with another school.

    Like

  5. Hi Josie,
    Week 7

    What a great way to use 3D printers for elementary students! Using different colors to teach the way word parts blend, to create word families and to label play areas in a Kindergarten room. Math comparisons and concepts come alive with manipulative items. We would no longer be limited to what the manufacturers create for us. We could make measuring devices, meaningful to the student items for categorizing, then using these for gifting. For example, categorizing animals or sea life from the area that students made, use them to study math with, then pass them to the next class or trade with another school.

    Like

  6. Josie,
    Week 7

    What a great way to use 3D printers for elementary students! Using different colors to teach the way word parts blend, to create word families and to label play areas in a Kindergarten room. Math comparisons and concepts come alive with manipulative items. We would no longer be limited to what the manufacturers create for us. We could make measuring devices, meaningful to the student items for categorizing, then using these for gifting. For example, categorizing animals or sea life from the area that students ade, use them to study math with, then pass them to the next class or trade with another school.

    Like

  7. Josie,
    Week 7
    @Jjleach757Leach

    What a great way to use 3D printers for elementary students! Using different colors to teach the way word parts blend, to create word families and to label play areas in a Kindergarten room. Math comparisons and concepts come alive with manipulative items. We would no longer be limited to what the manufacturers create for us. We could make measuring devices, meaningful to the student items for categorizing, then using these for gifting. For example, categorizing animals or sea life from the area that students made, use them to study math with, then pass them to the next class or trade with another school.

    Like

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